Belgium

Doing Business in Belgium

As one of the founding and central members of the European Union (EU) and home to the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO) headquarters, Brussels is one of the most important business hubs in the world which might seem surprising given the country’s modest size and economic influence. Classed as ‘moderately free’ from governmental interference the Belgian administration have abstained from intervening too much in industry unlike the extremely interventionist governments of southern neighbour, France. Via tax incentives and various measures, the Belgian government has endeavoured to create a business environment ideal for a thriving private sector economy. The Belgian economy is also aided by an openness to foreign trade and investment with free-market competition. All this contributes to making doing business in Belgium an appealing prospect.

When considering doing business in Belgium it is important to bear in mind that Belgium is a divided nation. Comprising ten provinces and 589 communes, Belgium is divided by two main ethnic groups – the French-speaking Walloons based in the Wallonia located in the south of the country and the Dutch-speaking Flemish population of Flanders in the north. Tensions often arise between the two groups with the traditionally influential Walloons being surpassed by the rising prosperity of the Flanders. How does this effect professionals doing business in Belgium? As a result of the tensions inherent in Belgian society compromise is often a major factor in being successful in the Belgian business setting.

Balance must be struck between the inclusiveness of employees’ opinions and a directional management style. Concessions must be made to reach a workable and acceptable solution. English is the advisable language for foreign and visiting professionals to speak, even if they are fluent in French or Dutch, to avoid inadvertently aligning with one ethnic group. The downside of compromise is that decision-making can take time and change in the world of Belgian business can be slow.

The World Business Culture website has all the logistical recommendations and market-entry tips based on first-class expertise and experience to help you understand Belgian dualism, overcome the associated challenges and flourish when doing business in Belgium.

 

Author

This country-specific business culture profile was written by Keith Warburton who is the founder of the cultural awareness training consultancy Global Business Culture.  Global Business culture is a leading training provider in the fields of cross-cultural communication and global virtual team working.  We provide training to global corporations in live classroom-based formats, through webinars and also through our cultural awareness digital learning hub, Global Business Compass.

This World Business Culture profile is designed as an introduction to business culture in Australia only and a more detailed understanding needs a more in-depth exploration which we can provide through our training and consultancy services.


Author

This country-specific business culture profile was written by Keith Warburton who is the founder of the cultural awareness training consultancy Global Business Culture

Global Business culture is a leading training provider in the fields of cross-cultural communication and global virtual team working.  We provide training to global corporations in live classroom-based formats, through webinars and also through our cultural awareness digital learning hub, Global Business Compass.

This World Business Culture profile is designed as an introduction to business culture in Belgium only and a more detailed understanding needs a more in-depth exploration which we can provide through our training and consultancy services.

Country Breakdown

11

Million

Population

Euro

Currency

$ 466

Billion

GDP

30,528

km2

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